Elizabeth Warren

In poll after poll, Americans give the cold shoulder to Congress. The latest Gallup poll shows that Americans give Congress an 18 percent approval rating — its highest mark since May 2015.

Despite the bottom-of-the-barrel numbers for Congress, many Americans tend to approve of their specific representative. But in 2014, 51 percent of respondents said they disapprove of their representative, the first time that number crested the 50 percent mark.

With all of these negative reviews, it’s worth asking: Do Americans like anyone in Washington, D.C.?

Using data from Morning Consult, Graphiq politics site InsideGov examined which senators are the most popular among their constituents. Morning Consult conducted interviews with more than 62,000 registered voters from Jan. 8, 2016, to April 17, 2016, to find which senators have the highest approval rating. InsideGov ranked the list by approval rating, and in the event of a tie, senators are ranked by their disapproval rating. In one instance, two senators have the same approval and disapproval numbers; they were listed alphabetically.

#25. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va.

Shelley Moore Capito

Approval Rating: 57 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 25 Percent
No Opinion: 18 Percent

Capito, a Republican out of West Virginia, began her career in the U.S. House in 2001. When she was elected to the Senate in 2014, Capito became the first female senator to represent West Virginia.

#24. Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M.

Tom Udall

Approval Rating: 57 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 23 Percent
No Opinion: 20 Percent

This Democrat out of New Mexico is part of the large Udall family, which planted its political roots in the western states of Arizona and Colorado. Udall served in the House of Representatives for 10 years before being elected to the Senate in 2008.

#23. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H.

Jeanne Shaheen

Approval Rating: 58 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 33 Percent
No Opinion: 9 Percent

Shaheen has served in politics since the early 1990s, getting her start in state-level work in New Hampshire. The Democrat served three terms as governor, and was first elected to the Senate in 2008. She won reelection in 2014 against Republican Scott Brown, a one-time Cosmo centerfold who entered politics in Massachusetts in 1998.

#22. Sen. Michael Enzi, R-Wyo.

Mike Enzi

Approval Rating: 58 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 21 Percent
No Opinion: 21 Percent

In 2014, the Wyoming Republican won reelection with 71 percent of the vote. Enzi is among the most conservative members of Congress, according to a recent InsideGov analysis.

#21. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

Ron Wyden

Approval Rating: 58 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 21 Percent
No Opinion: 21 Percent

This Democrat out of Oregon has been a staple on Capitol Hill for 35 years, first serving in the House of Representatives. He was elected to the Senate in 1996, and is running for his fifth consecutive term in 2016.

#20. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala.

Richard Shelby

Approval Rating: 59 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 28 Percent
No Opinion: 13 Percent

Shelby began his career as a Democrat, but switched to the Republican Party in 1994. He was elected to the Senate in 1986 and is the chairman of the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs.

#19. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.

Richard Blumenthal

Approval Rating: 59 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 27 Percent
No Opinion: 14 Percent

Before his election to the Senate in 2010, Blumenthal was a lawyer and served as Connecticut’s Attorney General for 20 years. He attended Yale Law School with former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the 1970s, and hosted a fundraiser in March for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential run.

#18. Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I.

Jack Reed

Approval Rating: 59 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 25 Percent
No Opinion: 16 Percent

A Rhode Island native, Reed has served in the Senate since 1997. He was reelected in 2014 with about 71 percent of the vote.

#17. Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont.

Steve Daines

Approval Rating: 59 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 23 Percent
No Opinion: 18 Percent

This freshman senator from Montana served one term in the House before his 2014 election to the Senate.

#16. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska

Lisa Murkowski

Approval Rating: 59 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 21 Percent
No Opinion: 20 Percent

Murkowski has served in the Senate since 2002. In 2010, tea party favorite Joe Miller defeated Murkowski in the Republican primary in Alaska. But Murkowski ran as a write-in candidate during the general election that November and won with 39.94 percent of the vote, compared to Miller’s 35.49 percent. Murkowski is running for reelection in 2016, and will face former Anchorage Mayor Dan Sullivan in this year’s GOP primary.

#15. Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md.

Barbara Mikulski

Approval Rating: 60 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 21 Percent
No Opinion: 18 Percent

After serving five terms in the Senate and 10 years in the House, Mikulski announced she would not run for reelection in 2016. She first came to Capitol Hill in 1977 and is the longest serving female member of Congress.

#14. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

Elizabeth Warren

Approval Rating: 61 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 27 Percent
No Opinion: 12 Percent

A Harvard Law professor turned senator, Warren is a progressive firebrand who made her name advocating for consumer financial protections. She was elected to the Senate in 2012.

#13. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D.

John Thune

Approval Rating: 62 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 26 Percent
No Opinion: 13 Percent

A South Dakota native, Thune was first elected to the Senate in 2004. He ran uncontested in 2010 because state Democrats felt the race would be pointless against the well-liked senator. “We just concluded that John Thune is an extremely popular senator who is going to win another term in the Senate,” Democratic state Sen. Scott Heidepriem said at the time.

#12. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.

Chuck Schumer

Approval Rating: 62 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 23 Percent
No Opinion: 15 Percent

This Brooklyn native is a lifelong politician, joining the New York state Assembly in January 1975 at the age of 24. Schumer went on to serve in the U.S. House for 18 years, and assumed his Senate seat in 1999.

Schumer is running for reelection in 2016. Should he win his race, he will likely take over as the Senate Democratic leader. Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., is retiring at the end of this year.

#11. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va.

Mark Warner

Approval Rating: 62 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 21 Percent
No Opinion: 16 Percent

Warner served one term as governor of Virginia before his election to the U.S. Senate in 2008. In 2014, he won reelection in a hotly contested race against well-known Republican strategist Ed Gillespie.

#10. Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn.

Al Franken

Approval Rating: 63 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 26 Percent
No Opinion: 11 Percent

For Franken, serving two terms in the Senate has been no laughing matter. The longtime “Saturday Night Live” cast member was first elected in 2008 after a tight race that required a manual recount and the Minnesota Supreme Court to weigh in on the results.

#9. Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del.

Chris Coons

Approval Rating: 63 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 24 Percent
No Opinion: 13 Percent

A Delaware native, Coons was first elected to the Senate in 2010. Although he initially identified as a Republican, Coons said he became a Democrat after a trip to Kenya during his junior year at Amherst College.

#8. Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo.

John Barrasso

Approval Rating: 65 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 27 Percent
No Opinion: 8 Percent

Barrasso first came to Capitol Hill in 2007, when he was appointed to fill the seat of the late Sen. Craig Thomas, who died from leukemia. In the 2012 election, Barrasso won his first full term with 76 percent of the vote.

#7. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn.

Amy Klobuchar

Approval Rating: 68 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 21 Percent
No Opinion: 11 Percent

In 2006, Klobuchar became the first woman to be elected to represent Minnesota in the Senate. In 2008, the New York Times name-dropped her as a potential for the first female president of the U.S.

#6. Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del.

Tom Carper

Approval Rating: 69 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 20 Percent
No Opinion: 11 Percent

This Democrat has bounced around Delaware politics since the 1970s, first serving as the state’s treasurer and then in the U.S. House. Carper was then the governor for eight years before getting elected to the Senate in 2000. He was reelected to his third term in 2012 with 66.4 percent of the vote.

#5. Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt.

Patrick Leahy

Approval Rating: 73 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 19 Percent
No Opinion: 8 Percent

Leahy has been a familiar face on Capitol Hill for decades, winning his first election to the Senate in 1974. A Democrat out of Vermont, Leahy tends to hold more liberal views.

#4. Sen. Angus King, I-Maine

Angus King

Approval Rating: 74 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 14 Percent
No Opinion: 11 Percent

King served as the governor of Maine for two terms, and 10 years later, he was sworn into the Senate. In between his stints in the government, King went on a 15,000-mile road trip with his family and taught courses on leadership at Bowdoin College and Bates College.

#3. Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D.

John Hoeven

Approval Rating: 74 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 10 Percent
No Opinion: 16 Percent

Hoeven jumped into politics in 2000 and hasn’t looked back. He was elected to three terms as North Dakota’s governor, and then to the Senate in 2010. The Republican is running for reelection in 2016.

#2. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine

Susan Collins

Approval Rating: 79 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 13 Percent
No Opinion: 8 Percent

Collins, a Republican out of Maine, has the second-highest approval rating on this list. She was first elected to the Senate in 1996, and currently heads up the Special Committee on Aging.

#1. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

Bernie Sanders

Approval Rating: 80 Percent
Disapproval Rating: 17 Percent
No Opinion: 2 Percent

Sanders has found fans on the presidential trail and in his home state of Vermont, where his constituents give him an 80 percent approval rating. The 2016 Democratic presidential candidate was first elected to the Senate in 2006, and served in the House before then for 16 years.

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