The Latest: Possible accomplices of suicide bomber sought

A woman pays her respects at a symbolic memorial at Tekhnologichesky Institute subway station in St. Petersburg, Russia, Tuesday, April 4, 2017. A bomb blast tore through a subway train deep under Russia’s second-largest city St. Petersburg Monday, killing several people and wounding many more in a chaotic scene that left victims sprawled on a smoky platform. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — The Latest on the deadly subway bombing in St. Petersburg (all times local):

10:30 p.m.

Russian investigators are searching for possible accomplices of a 22-year-old native of the Central Asian country of Kyrgyzstan who has been identified as the suicide bomber in the St. Petersburg subway.

The bomber, identified as Akbarzhon Dzhalilov, had lived in St. Petersburg for several years, obtaining Russian citizenship and working as a car repairman and later at a sushi bar.

Pages on his social media networks reflected his interest in radical Islam and martial arts, but those who met Dzhalilov described him as a calm and friendly man.

His ethnic Uzbek family lived in Osh, a city in southern Kyrgyzstan that saw at least 470 people killed and thousands injured in clashes between ethnic Kyrgyz and minority Uzbeks in 2010.

Dzhalilov and 13 other people died in Monday’s attack on an underground subway train.

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5:45 p.m.

Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo says the Eiffel Tower will remain dark overnight to honor the victims of the St. Petersburg subway bombing.

Hidalgo said the lights on the famous monument will be switched off at midnight in Paris, when it will be 1 a.m. Wednesday in St. Petersburg.

The mayor made the announcement in a tweet that carried the hashtag #WeareUnited written in French.

The move came as officials in Berlin were being criticized for deciding not to bathe the Brandenburg Gate in the colors of the Russian flag.

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5:30 p.m.

A row has erupted over Berlin’s decision not to illuminate the Brandenburg Gate in the colors of the Russian flag following the deadly subway bombing in St. Petersburg.

Critics accuse the state of Berlin of being indifferent to the deaths of Russians, noting that the city’s iconic monument was bathed in the colors of other countries following attacks in London, Paris, Brussels and Istanbul.

Berlin authorities say those four places are Berlin’s official partner cities, but acknowledge that exceptions have been made. The gate was lit up with the relevant colors after attacks in Jerusalem and Orlando, Florida, for example.

Klaus Lederer, Berlin’s top cultural official, called Tuesday for an end to the practice to prevent debates about the issue in future. He says that until then, Russia’s national colors should be projected on the gate.

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3:50 p.m.

Russian investigators have identified a 22-year old Kyrgyz-born man as the suicide bomber in Monday’s blast on the St. Petersburg subway.

The Investigative Committee said in a statement on Tuesday that they believe Akbardzhon Dzhalilov set off a bomb on a train that killed 14 people and wounded dozens. It was unclear if the figure of 14 included the bomber.

The investigators also said that forensic experts found Dzhalilov’s DNA on a bag containing a bomb that was found and deactivated at another subway station in St. Petersburg on Monday.

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3:10 p.m.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande have discussed with Russian President Vladimir Putin ways to boost anti-terrorism cooperation in the aftermath of the St. Petersburg subway bombing.

The Kremlin on Tuesday published summaries of Putin’s phone calls with Merkel and Hollande as well as with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan who also called Putin on Tuesday to offer his condolences for the attack that claimed 14 lives and injured dozens.

The Kremlin said Merkel, Hollande and Putin “stressed the need to intensify cooperation in order to counter terrorism which is a common threat for all nations” and agreed to improve intelligence sharing.

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2:20 p.m.

The foreign ministry of the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan says a Kazakh citizen was among the 14 killed in Monday’s blast on the St. Petersburg subway.

The ministry said on its website on Tuesday that relatives have identified the victim’s body, and that it will be taken to Kazakhstan for burial.

The St. Petersburg City Hall said there are several foreign nationals among those killed and 49 injured but it would not give details.

Russian officials said investigators have identified a man whose body parts were found on the train and who is suspected to be a suicide bomber

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2:05 p.m.

Russian news agencies say the St. Petersburg subway stations shut down after a bomb threat have reopened.

At least four stations were closed on Tuesday after a call about a possible bomb.

Russian news agencies on Tuesday quoted the subway administration that full service on all lines and at all stations was restored by early afternoon.

The bomb scare follows a train bombing on Monday that killed at least 14 people in Russia’s second-largest city.

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1:10 p.m.

Russian investigators say they believe a suicide bomber was behind a deadly attack on the subway in Russia’s second-largest city on Monday.

A blast inside a train on the St. Petersburg subway claimed 14 lives and injured dozens.

The Investigative Committee said in a statement on Tuesday that they suspect that a man whose body fragments they found in the train was a suicide bomber. The committee said they identified him but would not release the details in the interests of the probe.

Earlier, Kyrgyzstan’s State Committee for National Security identified a suspect as Kyrgyz-born Russian Akbarzhon Dzhalilov. It is unclear whether the Russian and Kyrgyz statements referred to the same man.

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1 p.m.

The Kremlin spokesman says intelligence agencies will look into the fact that Monday’s subway blast in St. Petersburg happened while President Vladimir Putin was in town.

Dmitry Peskov told reporters on Tuesday that the fact that Putin was in the city when the bomb went off, although several dozen miles away from where he was hosting talks, “makes one pause” and is “something for the intelligence agencies to analyze.”

The explosion on a subway train under Russia’s second-largest city killed at least 14 people on Monday and wounded dozens.

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12:35 p.m.

Four subway stations in St. Petersburg are now closed following a bomb threat, the day after a bomb killed 14 people and wounded dozens.

The Sennaya Square station in the city center was cordoned off on Tuesday, and commuters were told via a PA announcement that three more stations have also been closed down.

A bomb went off on a subway train under Russia’s second-largest city on Monday. A second device was found and deactivated.

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12:15 p.m.

The driver of the St. Petersburg subway train hit by a bomb appeared in front of reporters on Tuesday looking tired but not visibly shaken by the events of the previous day.

Alexander Kavernin, 50, who has worked on the subway for 14 years said he heard the sound of a blast while his train was running, called security and carried on to the station as the emergency instructions prescribe.

“I had no time to think about fear at that moment,” he said.

The decision to keep moving was praised by authorities as aiding evacuation efforts and reducing the danger to passengers who would have had to walk along the electrified tracks.

Oleg Alexeyev, 53, who trains sniffer dogs for the police, went to the Technological Institute station Tuesday morning to lay flowers in the memory of those who died nearby.

“I traveled on the same route this morning just to see how it felt and think about life. You begin to feel the thin line about life and death,” he said.

The explosion occurred in midafternoon as the train traveled between stations on one of the city’s north-south lines.

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12:05 p.m.

Russian emergency officials say they have closed a subway station in St. Petersburg following a bomb threat.

The press office of the local emergency situations ministry said on Tuesday they received a call about a bomb at the Sennaya Square station.

An explosion on a moving train near the same station killed 14 people on Monday and wounded dozens.

Fire engines and ambulances were seen parked on the square outside the security cordon on Sennaya Tuesday morning.

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11:20 a.m.

Russia’s health minister has raised the death toll from Monday’s blast on the St. Petersburg subway to 14.

Veronika Skvortsova said in a televised briefing on Tuesday that 11 people died on the spot, one died in an ambulance and two at the hospital. Forty-nine people are still hospitalized, Skvortsova said.

An unidentified explosive device went off in a subway train under Russia’s second-largest city while President Vladimir Putin was visiting the city. A second bomb was found and deactivated. There was no immediate claim of responsibility.

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9:30 a.m.

The intelligence agency in the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan says the man behind Monday’s deadly bombing on the St. Petersburg subway is a Kyrgyz-born Russian citizen.

A bomb blast tore through a subway train under Russia’s second-largest city on Monday, killing 11 people and wounding more than 40. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack, which came while President Vladimir Putin was visiting the city, his hometown.

Kyrgyzstan’s State Committee for National Security said in a statement on Tuesday that the man behind the bombing is a Kyrgyz-born Russian national. The intelligence agency said it is cooperating with Russian authorities to help the investigation.

It is unclear whether the attack was a suicide bombing or whether the bomber got away.

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