OPEN BURNING ADVISORY: TUESDAY, June 13, 2017,

Pollution Levels & ForecastAir Quality Trends & Data

Alert

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017, updated on Monday, June 12 at 8:00am. SYNOPSIS: A cold front will be moving southward across our region during the day. Skies will start out mostly sunny but clouds will be on the increase with scattered showers developing from north to south primarily during the afternoon. Winds should be out of the west and southwest at 10-15 mph. AIR QUALITY: Fine particle levels should average in the low-Moderate range. Ozone levels will likely elevate into the Moderate range in most areas of the State and into the Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (USG) range in southeastern sections during the afternoon. OPEN BURNING ADVISORY: Open burning is currently prohibited in Massachusetts.

Open-Burning Fact Sheet & FAQ’s   |   Fire District Map

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Forecasted Air Quality Levels
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Forecast AQI of

Health Implications What causes good or bad air?

Health Implications

The monitor colors on the map tell you how relatively clean or polluted the air is, and what this might mean for your health. The ranges are the corresponding Air Quality Index values.
Learn More . . . about Pollutants, Health Effects, and Standards; FAQ about the map

good0-50 = Good
Air pollution poses little or no risk
good51-100 = Moderate
Air quality is acceptable; however, for some pollutants there may be a moderate health concern for a very small number of people. Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors.
unhealth for sensitive subgroups101-150 = Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups
Members of sensitive groups may experience health effects. For example, people with lung disease are at greater risk from exposure to ozone, while people with either lung disease or heart disease are at greater risk from exposure to particle pollution. Active children and adults, and people with lung disease, such as asthma, should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors. The general public is not likely to be affected when the AQI is in this range.
unhealthy151-200 = Unhealthy
Everyone may begin to experience health effects; members of sensitive groups may experience more serious health effects. Active children and adults, older adults, and people with lung disease, such as asthma, should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors. Everyone else, especially children, should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors.
very unhealthy201-300 = Very Unhealthy
Health alert: everyone may experience more serious health effects. Active children and adults, older adults, and people with heart or lung disease, such as asthma, should avoid all outdoor exertion. Everyone else, especially children, should avoid prolonged or heavy exertion outdoors.
no dataNo Data
The monitor/s at this site is/are down. Monitors are typically down for short periods for maintenance.
Health effects . . . learn moreBehind the Colors & Numbers
How we determine healthy vs. unhealthy air

The colors are based on the Air Quality Index (AQI). The AQI is calculated from the pollution level and the pollutant standards. Pollutants have different standards, but the AQI is a number that allows levels of different pollutants to be put on the same scale.

Think of the AQI as a yardstick that runs from 0 to 500. The higher the AQI value, the greater the level of air pollution and the greater the health concern. For example, an AQI value of 50 represents good air quality with little potential to affect public health.

An AQI value of 100 generally corresponds to the national air quality standard for the pollutant, which is the level US EPA has set to protect public health. AQI values below 100 are generally thought of as satisfactory. When AQI values are above 100, air quality is considered to be unhealthy at first for certain sensitive groups of people, then for everyone as AQI values get higher.

For example: an AQI of 100 for ozone corresponds to an ozone level of 0.070 parts per million (averaged over 8 hours). An AQI of 100 for PM2.5 (particles up to 2.5 micrometers in diameter) corresponds to a level of 35 micrograms per cubic meter (averaged over 24 hours).

Source: USEPA . . . learn more

Boston: Current HazeCam.net Photo

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